A Quickie! – How to Win the Climate Change Argument.

“Climate Change” is the hot topic (OK – depending where you live: One of the Hot-ter topics) of the moment. One on which there are particularly digressing opinions, thoughts/beliefs and statements of ‘fact’.

PART of the trouble dealing with the topic is the inability of both sides to correctly state what it is they are talking about (in some cases because they really don’t have any background or expertise on the subject – or a clue what they are arguing).argument

I’d like to suggest to both ‘sides’ that they no longer argue against ‘Climate Change’ but argue instead about what MAN is doing that worsens the effects on us and on our environments that we need, love and live in!
And what we all can, and governments and organisations SHOULD, do to limit the warming of our planet, which is only going to:

Increase sea levels, which is disastrous if you live near a waterline;
Make the oceans more acidic as concentrations of COtwo gas increase in our
mutually shared atmosphere.
Increase the number and severity of catastrophic weather events such as
drought, flood, cyclones, tornadoes, forest fires and mudslides/avalanches.
Melt glaciers resulting in vastly altered water supplies to those who depend
upon Spring melts for water.

Arguing about the cause of all these either as a whole or individually does NOT help the situation one iota.

Raising your awareness of just what the 7 billion humans are doing that adds to the rate of natural climate change and/or rate of pollution or damaging of our environment CAN!!!

https://interestingengineering.com/10-ways-humans-impact-the-environment

love.

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15 comments

    • The naysayers believe it’s all down to nature and it is somewhat unpredictable and things have been ‘worse’ many times in the long past. There is no point arguing with stupidity.

      My point was we can all agree there are things we as individuals and things done by corporations in the name of profit, and government in the name of staying in power, that is causing the only planet we have to live on considerable harm which, when added to natural climate change, causes disaster for many humans – the planet will survive but not with us enjoying the lifestyles we do now.

      It’s in ALL our interests to think what we are doing and stop doing the stuff that ads to the damage or builds more pressure on the planet to maintain it’s current equilibrium. 😉

      Like

    • True! The real question for all of us is not If, but What?

      What can i do that helps our planet/my (and other people’s) children’s futures’?

      What should i not do or cut back on doing so as to not affect our environment adversely?

      Thanks for your kind comment. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Other than not sending nuclear warheads towards each other, preventing the pollution of our drinking waters, minimizing pollution, there’s really nothing more we need to do. The Earth is incredible. It keeps demonstrating how little we really are. Remember the Gulf waters incident in which people went out to clean the spill, then one day it just vanished? Little amebas in the water ate up the oil. Why? Because the ocean bottom constantly leaks millions of tons of oil, and there are creatures feasting on this. Yes, we can harm the drinking waters. Yes, we can pollute the air, making difficult for those nearby with asthma. Yes, nuclear warheads can destroy sections of the Earth, making some areas unliveable for a time. But we’re not changing the climate, at least not to the degree of making this planet unliveable, but we can harm on a microcosm
    Question: Who stands to gain from our believing in man-made climate change? Think about that.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I find it far easier to contemplate who stands to gain the most from continuing to burn fossil fuels and not switching to technological advancements to produce clean reliable renewable energy sources that don’t destroy rainforests by the square kilometer or send billions of tonnes of CO2 into our atmosphere at the same time. We have mutiplied the number of humans living on this planet by a factor of roughly 10 in the last 500 years and have multiplied the energy output by several orders of magnitude greater than that.

      if you think we can continue doing this without seriously degrading the living conditions for everybody on the planet you are living in a fool’s paradise.

      The Earth is an amazing (and our only) life-supporting environment but it depends upon maintaining a very fragile balance – we need to work WITH it in maintaining that balance not doing all the things we are increasingly doing to upset it and just hope the earth will still
      support our lives.

      Be quite clear here – the earth in one form or another will survive no matter what (until the Sun turns into a Red Giant or some other astronomic catastrophe happens) – I’m not concerned for the Earth. it’s those 7 billion other people like yourself and myself who are at ever increasin risk of not having a livable environment because of our massive disregard for the air, water animal and plant life we currently have that gives us all the lifestyle many of us actually enjoy and wish to keep that i fear losing. You should too.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The ecosystem isn’t fragile. It’s quite robust. Part of my reasoning comes from living in many places, travels, and research. The planet is strong and glowing. Nothing we’re doing is affecting it in any way that will reduce the population. Yes, again, we can harm the environment in a microcosm, but even that heals, albeit over the time necessary. * At times, I take the time to read opposing points of view, really listening and reading the words. Thus far, I have never heard anyone believing in human created global destruction that was coming from understanding. Mostly rhetoric and emotions. I walk outside, and everything is normal. I think about the Gulf “disaster,” and the Earth cleaned it up. Anyways, thanks for your input. That’s pretty much all I can say in this line of writing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • When you say the ecosystem is not fragile could i just ask you to research all the plant and animal species that have become extinct in the last 200 years since man has developed industrial technology and increased it’s demand for environment based products and then say just how ‘robust’ the (original) system is?

      Our environment undergoes constant change but it mostly does so at rates that are very hard for a single person to detect in a span of less than 50 years. please look at a larger picture than just your own experiences and the one fact(??) you have gleaned about a single oil spill.

      There are people currently living all their lives in a ‘microcosm’ who very soon will no longer be able to do so. Research the Maldives and the smaller Micronesian islands as but two examples. Consider the effect of losing the Himalayan Spring icefall melt runoff on the lives of the billion people who depend upon it.

      I disagree with your assessment.

      One final point – if i am wrong the worst that could happen is i ( and others like me) go without a few unnecessary luxuries and have less money to spend on me and my family.

      If you are wrong and humans ARE contributing to the rising numbers of environmental catastrophes and global warming we could kill billions in the future – perhaps as little as 50-100 years?

      Is that really worth the risk you reckon?

      FYI – i live in a city of 2 million people. We are undergoing day 5 of a heatwave with temps in excess of 35 degrees C in a world where the last 4 years have been the hottest on record. Since i have been living here the average rainfall has dropped by more than 30% on the 200 year average. We used to rely upon winter rainfall for our dam catchment to supply us with our drinking water. We’ve had water restrictions in place since the 1990’s non-stop over our Summer periods ( Sep-May). Dam storage is now so low we have had to build not one but two massive desalination plants to convert sea water to drinking water (at considerable public expense) and it is still not enough so that we use underground water from ancient aquifers to ensure my family can drink and bathe.

      This is solely due to the weather pattern changing and rainfall that used to reach up to my city on the coast now falls in the Southern Ocean – The climate has changed – i’m sure it’s just a coincidence that we humans are now pouring over 1.5% of the 1970 atmospheric CO2 levels into the atmosphere every year and that as a result we are now at the highest level of CO2 concentration seen in the last 800,000 years! How’s that for emotion and rhetoric?

      Like

  3. Excellent use of intellect, but I will still rely on common sense, along with my research, looking around, and realizing the world is okay. I too have heard people use the terms research. Do you know what I’ve discovered? Either they can’t produce any real research, or the research they provide is not truly scientifically based, usually articles and such. No, I am unwilling to go without some of the things I’ve grown used to or find interesting because of others’ beliefs. I’m not interested in being labelled “green” friendly. I believe in reducing pollution, just because it makes sense,, but I know I’m nothing compared to this planet. For those willing to take a trip across oceans, travel through states including Utah, and run the numbers as I have, they will realize with time the difference between intellect and understanding. But they’ll have to give up popularity for this. But thanks for the talk. One thing I’ve gotten used to explaining is understanding cause and effect, then showing that just because one thing comes before another doesn’t mean one is the cause of the other. Case in point: a boy shouts. The sun come out.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for the compliment!

      Indeed there is a great deal of difference between sequential events and cause and effect and many many of us (humans) are woefully inadequate at using real logic when it comes to some of the conclusions they draw from common observations.

      I applaud you for being part of the small percentage of Americans who have actually visited somewhere outside their own country (or state in some cases). it is to your credit.

      Popularity has never been a thing i have concerned myself with seeking to make up my own mind on the basis of evidence rather than other people’s ‘popular’ opinions. I research and check and analyse data, reports and scientific papers to help my level of understanding of the world as well as myself, the two of which are intimately connected in a myriad of ways.

      I hope you continue observing places other than just those that surround you or your ‘home’. and gain greater wisdom in the process.

      it has been an interesting conversation even if i doubt either of us have changed our viewpoint (perspective) all that much.

      As for you being ‘nothing’ compared to the planet i get your intent but i multiply my ‘nothingness’ by the number of humans currently living on it and the numbers yet to come and consider what our planet would be like if suddenly all of them were able to consume and expel the same amount of food, energy, carbon dioxide, methane (from the animals that provide the meat we eat), water and minerals that you and i are so very fortunate enough to have access to?

      Billions cannot at this time – but billions are beginning to catch up to our level more quickly than our ancestors ever did to get us to this point.

      Happy Trails!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for taking the time to discuss these issues. If everyone could learn about differing opinions, that it’s healthy for our country, then Congress would learn how to talk with one another without attacking each others’ backgrounds and foibles. Agreeing to disagree is the foundation of honest debates. And I’ve always believed if everyone were to be encouraged to think for themselves, if children received a quality education and not altered texts, and debates were taught correctly in schools, then the best answers would come up. I believe that. A real democratic republic inspires and brings out the best. And good solutions is what we need.

        Liked by 2 people

        • I believe all humans need to learn to be slower to judge and to take longer to consider the truth of any given matter.

          This is becoming increasingly more difficult in a world where things are changing at an ever increasing rate.

          A Democratic Republic – i like that! It brings to mind a vision of the best of both ‘sides’ of America coming together as One and not, as is more apparent today, the worst of both sides tearing each other apart.

          Liked by 1 person

        • They tear into each other because that’s what the previous generation of politicians were looking for. It’s become a fight of ideologies and an attempt to break the “shackles” of our constitution. The constitution actually “frees” us to pursue our dreams, respecting others. However, many view the constitution as hand-cuffing them, not realizing what they’ve been taught to believe is actually a warped view of reality. I think that’s why I questioned much of what I was taught and told in my youth when my common sense indicated.

          Liked by 1 person

        • You probably remember who first said: “A House divided against itself cannot stand!” Another earlier politician John Dickinson quoted: “United we stand, divided we fall.”

          Neither of them were original, Lincoln’s was from the New Testament and Johnson’s was first used by a Greek fable writer over 2,000 years before.

          Those who really hold true power in this world know the way to keep it is to get the ‘general’ population fighting each other rather than the ones we should be fighting – them! The politicians are simply bought by the elite few to help achieve this. Much of those who work in the media are the same, whether they know it or not.

          It’s more than just a USA thing by the way. It happens everywhere. Question everything, put your faith in what is proven True (and not just true-for-you!)

          Liked by 1 person

  4. What has happened in America is the bats got in the belfry. The tactics of dividing America have accomplished much. We’re at a point in which the division is more than serious. It’s monumental and the media, politicians (compromised), and citizens who’ve lost the way, forgetting their heritage, continue the downward spiral. Gratefully, all is not lost. There are those who work hard reminding people of our past, our heritage, and what we stand to lose by not adhering to principles. Home schoolers are doing their part to properly educate their children, and some teachers, aware to what is happening, do so too. We also have some awake politicians and many in industry and small business. It’s a matter of believing and never giving in: we can’t lose what so many have fought for that we might have real freedom.

    Liked by 1 person

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